All scoreboards are on-going numerical indicators that can be charted, posted, and discussed. We do the best by having them show two different yet essential areas:

 Perception and Performance.

Scoreboards for Performance and Perception

All scoreboards are on-going numerical indicators that can be charted, posted, and discussed. And you do the best by having them show two different yet essential perspectives.
Performance scoreboards show what actually happens in your organization.
Perception scoreboards reveal how your customers regard what they receive from you.

PERFORMANCE SCOREBOARDS could include:

  • Number of on-time shipments this week.
  • Number of new customers this week.
  • Number of orders filled on the first call today.
  • Occupancy per night in a hotel.
  • Covers per shift in a restaurant.
  • PERCEPTION SCOREBOARDS could include anonymous ratings by customers on a 1 to 10 scale for statements like this:

    • Your people communicate that they want to serve me
    • I can count on your deliveries being on time.
    • I’m recommending your company to my friends and associate.
    • I received good value for my money. But do you need Perception Scoreboards if you are doing a good job?
      One man stood up in a division meeting and reported: “I guess we’re doing a good job. We aren’t getting many complaints.” This is a costly example of why people need systematic feedback on how their customers perceive them. Otherwise, they run around in the dark. In most organizations it’s difficult to receive useful feedback from the full range of customers for two reasons:
    • Only the extremely happy or extremely unhappy will take the time to say something. This causes the Bell Curve Blues.
    • Most people will not take the time to say anything. The right perception scoreboards solve the "Bell Curve Blues." The people who give volunteer feedback are those at each end of the bell curve-the extremely happy or the extremely unhappy. The people in the middle usually say nothing. At least they don’t say it to you. However, they often tell others if they have not told you.

    What are the secrets for getting useful Perceptions?

    • Find the response you want to improve and start measuring it.
    • Measure vital signs.
    • Best when the data is collected by people in the group, since people don't argue with their own data.
    • Best in simple line graphs or charts with the desired results going up.
    • Best when posted physically in the group. (In some organizations, electronic works better.)

    But aren't Perception Surveys just opinions that could be true or false?

    Yes, perceptions are opinions. However, most people act on their opinions. That's why we need to understand them.
    Perception scoreboards give you a volcano alert. Like that small puff of smoke, they alert you if an undesirable trend is starting to build up so you can take steps before it erupts.
    Perception scoreboards help you grow past common plateaus. The right scoreboards can give you insight into what is blocking growth.
    Perception scoreboards shorten meetings. They trim the discussions on what individuals believe people think and want.

    Isn't there a danger of over-surveying people?

    Yes. That's why I recommend developing a survey calendar. For example, survey people with names starting with A or B in January; C or D in February and so on.

    How do you get people to pay attention to the findings?

    • Report the results in terms of 100%. Don't say, "We got 3.2 on a scale of 1 to 4." People aren't motivated to improve a 3.2 because there is no psychological pull to earn a "4." However, there is to earn 100%. So survey on a 1 to 10 scale, but turn an 8.6 into an 86%. Since the third grade, most people have been motivated to get a 100%.
    • Report results every month. Although many surveys are done annually, staff and volunteers want to see improvements and the results of what they are doing. A year is too long. If you want proof that frequent feedback motivates people to improve, take a look at the people lined up in front of a row of video game machines where they are getting feedback every split second.
    • Add some Scoreboard drama. Have a key leader reveal the scoreboards to people at the end of the month. That's why it's important to have someone do the calls who is reliable and leak-proof.


    • When you want to improve it, measure it.
    • Best when they show both performance of the work group and perception of the customers of the work group.
    • Measure vital signs.
    • Best when the data is collected by people in the group, since people don't argue with their own data.
    • Best in simple line graphs or charts with the desired results going up.
    • Posted physically in the group. (In some organizations, electronic works better.)

     But are Perception Scoreboards important?

    Aren't they just opinions that could be true or false?


    Yes, perceptions are opinions. However, most people act on their opinions. That's why we need to understand them.

    The right perception scoreboards solve the "Bell Curve Blues." The people who give volunteer feedback are those at each end of the bell curve-The extremely happy or the extremely unhappy.

    Perception scoreboards give you a volcano alert. Like that small puff of smoke, they alert you if an undesirable trend is starting to build up so you can take steps before it erupts.

    Perception scoreboards help you grow past common plateaus. The right scoreboards can give you insight into what is blocking growth.

    Perception scoreboards shorten meetings. They trim the discussions on what individuals believe people think and want.

     Isn't there a danger of over-surveying people?

    Yes. That's why I recommend developing a survey calendar. For example, survey people with names starting with A or B in January; C or D in February and so on.

     How do you get staff & volunteers to pay attention to the findings?

    Report the results in terms of 100%. Don't say, "We got 3.2 on a scale of 1 to 4." People aren't motivated to improve a 3.2 because there is no psychological pull to earn a "4." However, there is to earn 100%. So survey on a 1 to 10 scale, but turn an 8.6 into an 86%. Since the third grade, most people have been motivated to get a 100%.

    Report results every month. Although many surveys are done annually, staff and volunteers want to see improvements and the results of what they are doing. A year is too long. If you want proof that frequent feedback motivates people to improve, take a look at the people lined up in front of a row of video game machines where they are getting feedback every split second. Why not put this powerful dynamic to work on purposes that glorify God.

    Add some Scoreboard drama. Have a key leader reveal the scoreboards to staff and volunteers at the end of the month. That's why it's important to have someone do the calls who is reliable and leak-proof.

     

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